The cinematic tale of Harrison Marks’ nudist feature Naked as Nature Intended, the iconic film that brought us Pamela Green in her birthday suit. Behind the scenes exclusives and never before seen pictures. The text is taken from Pamela’s unpublished biography. Hardback and Kindle version available. Buy your copy from Amazon

Harrison Marks and Pamela Green in the nudist film Naked as Nature Intended.

Naked as Nature Intended. The Epic Tale of a Nudist Picture. Hardback and Kindle.



An early picture of Pamela Green, wearing a petticoat and one stocking, taken by Alan Duncan.

Alan Duncan photograph of Pamela Green

Pamela Green by Alan Duncan.

In celebration of Queen Elizabeth II becoming the longest reigning monarch last week here is a stunning picture of Pamela Green that was taken to celebrate the Coronation in 1953.

A nude Pamela Green in 1953 with a union jack.

Pamela Green. Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, 2 June 1953.

A couple of great pictures from Pamela’s private collection.


Pamela Green (center) and fellow showgirls from Robert Nesbitt’s Latin Quarter on the roof of the London Casino in 1951. Greek Street and Old Compton Street can be seen below them and the Palace Theatre can be seen in the background.


On the corner of Leicester Court and Lisle Street Pamela Green and the Hurricanes show off their acrobatic act. They were all performing in Bernard Delfont’s Folies Bergère ‘Paris to Piccadilly’ at the London Hippodrome in 1952

Wonderful post on the Dambuster’s Blog about Doug.

The rest of the crew of AJ-O are also featured.
Pilot: Flt Sgt W C Townsend DFM
Flight engineer: Sgt D J D Powell
Navigator: Plt Off C L Howard
Bomb aimer: Sgt C E Franklin DFM
Wireless operator: Flt Sgt G A Chalmers
Rear Gunner: Raymond Wilkinson

Originally posted on Dambusters Blog:


Douglas Webb with his parents, Edward and Daisy Webb, and (left) his then fiancée, Anne Jones, photographed outside Buckingham Palace on 22 June 1943.

Sgt D E Webb: Front gunner

Lancaster serial number: ED886/G

Call sign: AJ-O

Third wave. The only aircraft to attack Ennepe Dam. Mine dropped successfully but failed to breach the dam.

Douglas Edward Webb was born in Leytonstone, London on 12 September 1922, one of the two children of Edward and Daisy Webb. After leaving school, he worked briefly for Ilford and then for the London News Agency in Fleet Street, as a photographic printer. He joined the RAF in 1940, as soon as he had turned 18, as he wanted to be an air gunner.

After a substantial delay, he began training in 1942 and qualified as a gunner later that year. He was posted to 49 Squadron where he became one of…

View original 800 more words

Native American Indian, Red Indian, Redskin, Headdress

La Belle Sauvage by Stephen Glass

A charming picture of La Belle Sauvage taken by Stephen Glass in the mid-1950s. From the original negative. Model unknown.

Somewhat of topic, it was around about this time that the publishers Cassell, who were founded in 1852 at La Belle Sauvage Yard, Ludgate Hill, commissioned a nude statue of Princess Pocahontas by David McFall for their new premises at Red Lion Square. This larger than life statue graced the entrance of their headquarters. As Cassell’s fortunes waned the firm moved from their imposing offices on Red Lion Square taking the statue with them. It is thought to have been sold at auction in 1996 to a private collector, which is rather a shame. I think central London could do with a delightful statue of Pocahontas.

Pocahontas was the daughter of the Indian Chief Powhatan. She married John Rolfe, a tobacco planter and travelled to England with her husband in 1616, where she was received as royalty. She captivated the London society. Whilst preparing to return to America, she became ill with smallpox and died in Gravesend, where she is buried, in March 1617.

Pamela Green as Rita Landre on the front cover of Film & Figure magazine, no.12, 1968. I am not sure why this American magazine merits the subtitle Nude Horizons in Creative Graphics, even after studying all 78 pages, 8 of which were in colour. Unfortunately, Pamela Green only features on the cover. There are several contributing photographers besides Harrison Marks such as Russell Gay and Serge Jacques. Released by the same company that published the hippie Jaybird.

Film and Figure Magazine

Rita Landre, aka Pamela Green, on the cover of Film & Figure magazine no. 12, 1968.


Roy Pointer

Roy Pointer (1923–2004), the cinematographer of Naked As Nature Intended, with Pamela Green in his arms.

Roy Pointer (1923–2004), the cinematographer of Naked As Nature Intended, carrying Pamela Green in his arms. Taken on the set by Douglas Webb. See the post Lucky Devil for more about Roy or check out the book Naked as Nature Intended: The Epic Tale of a Nudist Picture to find out more about the film.

Nudist Life at Spielplatz, the story of a modern experiment in the art of living by Charles Sennet, with an art supplement of photographs taken at the Hertfordshire nudist resort by Stephen Glass, was published by The Naturist Ltd. in 1956. The 56-page booklet is pretty rare so I was pretty surprised to come across a nice clean copy that I managed to match up with the original negative of the cover image taken by Stephen Glass. As you can see they flipped the image round for the cover. Not sure who the models are and I guess I should do a bit more research into Charles Sennet. If you know any details feel free to email me or post them in the comments.

Photo by Stephen Glass.

Nudist Life at Spielplatz by Charles Sennet. Photographs by Stephen Glass.

A rather delightful rare image of a young Pamela Green getting all Disney with a budgie. As far as I know unpublished. Taken by Stephen Glass at Spielplatz around the early ’50s —  if I’m not mistaken. Pretty sure the bird is stuffed. Taken from the original negative.

A nude Pamela Green with a budgie.

Pamela Green at Spielplatz by Stephen Glass

Photo of Pandora by Joan Craven.

Pamela Green as Pandora by Joan Craven

This picture is a favourite of mine. Pamela Green as Pandora, as photographed by Joan Craven. This was a freelance job while Pamela was working at the London Casino in Old Compton Street. Pamela Green met Joan Craven when she was sent by her agent to Kinocrat House to work for the photographer Walter Bird. Joan Craven shared studios with Walter. Pamela also posed as Circe, the goddess of magic, for Joan — a picture I’ve not yet come across.

For more about Joan read my earlier post Joan Craven (1897-1979)

Shona Craven has started a website dedicated to her great aunt Joan Craven. She is trying to piece together the details of Joan’s life. If you can have any information to share please get in touch with Shona at

« Older entries